Accidents of all sorts can lead to damage to the spinal cord if it’s hit or moved in a certain way. For a patient who has this type of injury, the future might not be the same as it was shaping up to be before the accident. If you’re in this position or know someone who is, remembering a few points about these injuries might help as you navigate through the transitions that are coming. 

When you first learn of the spinal cord injury, there are bound to be some questions. One of these is likely going to be what the future will hold. How will the injury heal? Will the paralysis or limited motion subside or improve at all? While doctors can’t tell patients exactly what will happen with the spinal cord injury, they can speak in terms of generalities that might help. 

The severity of the injury can have a role in this because more serious injuries are less likely to heal completely. Another point is that type of injury. Spinal cord damage falls into one of two categories – incomplete and complete

If the person has the ability to move or feel sensation in the area below the injury, they have an incomplete injury. If they don’t have the ability to move or feel sensation in that area, they have a complete injury. Typically, a person who has a complete injury is less likely to recover fully than one who has an incomplete injury. 

These injuries can be very costly, so anyone who suffered one at the hands of a person who was negligent may opt to pursue a claim for compensation. This can help them to cover the medical bills and other expenses.