In New Jersey, patients rely on medical professionals to have the knowledge and expertise to diagnose and treat them. While this is often the case, the reality is that medical professionals are human and are subject to human errors. They are also prone to the same impacts work hours and exhaustion can have on any worker. A medical professional’s mental and physical health care paramount when it comes to patient care, and when this is impacted, this too can impact the care a patient receives.

Daylight saving can cause medical mistakes

Based on a current study, researchers claim that the week following the annual spring forward daytime saving time may not be the best time to see a medical professional. This is based on statistically significant data researchers found, which illustrates an increase in patient safety-related incidents during the week following daylight saving time.

Why is this? Every year during this time, healthcare workers have less time in bed. Even when this amounts to just one hour of sleep, this can still generate sleep deprivation and a change in sleep pattern. As a result, this causes an increased risk for medical errors.

Risk of medical errors due to sleep deprivation

The study found that the week after the spring time change, safety-related incidents that likely resulted from human errors increased by 18.7%. This is based on an 8-year study of data, and the results indicate that this week is a high-risk time for patient safety-related incidents.

When medical errors occur, the health and life of a patient is compromised. Thus, when a patient suffers harm while receiving medical care, it is important to consider the possibility that mistakes were made. By looking further into the matter, patients not only get answers to their question but also the possibility to hold a negligent medical professional accountable. A medical malpractice action could help with assigning liability and the recovery of compensation for losses and damages suffered.